search/admin/spider_custom.php search/search.php fellowship_survey/survey.php Fellow Follow-up Survey Details - Alexander Robert BAY

DF (2002)

Fellow Information:
First Name
Alexander Robert
Middle Name
 
Last Name
BAY
Sex
Male
Organization
Chapman University
Title
Assistant Professor
Contact Address:
Address Type
Office
Address 1
Chapman University, History Department
Address 2 (optional)
One University Drive
City
Orange
State
CA
Zip Code
92866
Country
United States
Telephone
7147442136
Email
bay@chapman.edu
*Survey URL
http://www.jfny.org/fellowship_survey/survey.php?id=3264&sid=3b6b1a3e781f038e205e1080a71d63c1
Questions:
1. Are you enaged in Japanese Studies?

Answer: A. Yes, I am engaged in Japanese Studies at a university or research institution.

Field of Study: History

2. Please describe what you are currently doing. (If you have your own website or any relevant site, provide its URL.)

Answer: I teach East Asian history at Chapman while completing my first book on medicine and the making of modern Japan. I am also starting my second book-length project, a history of leprosy in Japan.

3. Where did you acquire your most advanced Japanese language training for your research?

Answer: A. I learned it at a university. (Lewis and Clark College, ICU, University of Oregon)

4. Have you ever participated in the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme?

Answer: NO

5. Have you earned a doctoral degree?

Answer: YES
Year: 2006
Field: History
University: Stanford

Optional Inquiry:
1. Please describe briefly how the Japan Foundation Fellowship experience influenced your career.

Answer: A Japan Foundation Fellowship allowed me to spend a year in Japan researching my PhD dissertation. In addition to collecting mountains of important historical materials, I also met several scholars who to this day remain my good friends and colleagues and who have influenced me in innumerable ways.

2. The Japan Foundation is planning to create a network or forum among past Japan Foundation fellows. Please let us know if you have any suggestions in terms of themes, format, etc.

Answer: A quick suggestion would be networks along disciplinary lines, for historians, for example, that could tie scholars together and give young or junior people access to senior people who have been doing research in Japan for many years.