search/admin/spider_custom.php search/search.php fellowship_survey/survey.php Fellow Follow-up Survey Details - Sumie JONES

PF (1989), RF (1998)

Fellow Information:
First Name
Sumie
Middle Name
A.
Last Name
JONES
Sex
Female
Organization
Indiana University
Title
Professor Emerita and Residential Fellow of institute for Advanced Study
Contact Address:
Address Type
Office
Address 1
Institute for Advanced Study, The Poplars Room 335, Indiana University
Address 2 (optional)
 
City
Bloomington
State
IN
Zip Code
47405
Country
United States
Telephone
812-855-8382
Email
joness@indiana.edu
*Survey URL
http://www.jfny.org/fellowship_survey/survey.php?id=3574&sid=391f06ebb885430dd27172b98f7d8665
Questions:
1. Are you enaged in Japanese Studies?

Answer: A. Yes, I am engaged in Japanese Studies at a university or research institution.

Field of Study: Literature

2. Please describe what you are currently doing. (If you have your own website or any relevant site, provide its URL.)

Answer: Having retired from teaching comparative literature, film studies, and Japanese literature, I currently conduct research as a residential fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study at Indiana University, Bloomington. I direct an international team study of early modern Japanese literature, which will result in a 3-volume anthology in English of Edo and Meiji popular literature.

3. Where did you acquire your most advanced Japanese language training for your research?

Answer: C. I am a native Japanese speaker.

4. Have you ever participated in the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme?

Answer: NO

Optional Inquiry:
1. Please describe briefly how the Japan Foundation Fellowship experience influenced your career.

Answer: The Japan Foundation's fellowship provided me with opportunities to meet not only Japanese scholars but also early modern literature specialists from various countries who lived in Tokyo or who happened to be visiting. I was able to discuss with them some problems of "canon" vis a vis the sort of literature of we are interested in. I also joined several study groups and learned how specialists in Japan worked together to decipher hand-written Edo texts and exchange information to clarify matters of obscurity in Edo materials. I decided to use the same team approach to facilitate the study of Edo texts in the U.S. By the time I left Tokyo, I had a team of about a dozen scholars who later helped me launch my gigantic project funded by the NEH and Toshiba international Foundation. It was an intensely productive year and I owe it to the Japan Foundation for giving me the time and space to cultivate the soil for the long-running project I am about to conclude.

2. The Japan Foundation is planning to create a network or forum among past Japan Foundation fellows. Please let us know if you have any suggestions in terms of themes, format, etc.

Answer: May I come back to this later?