search/admin/spider_custom.php search/search.php fellowship_survey/survey.php Fellow Follow-up Survey Details - Katherine TEGTMEYER PAK

DF (1994)

Fellow Information:
First Name
Katherine
Middle Name
 
Last Name
TEGTMEYER PAK (changed from PAK)
Sex
Female
Organization
St. Olaf College
Title
Associate Professor
Contact Address:
Address Type
Office
Address 1
1520 St. Olaf Avenue
Address 2 (optional)
 
City
Northfield
State
MN
Zip Code
55057
Country
United States
Telephone
507/786.3655
Email
ktp@stolaf.edu
*Survey URL
http://www.jfny.org/fellowship_survey/survey.php?id=3652&sid=fc862a57b6071dc709781134f1ae9e19
Questions:
1. Are you enaged in Japanese Studies?

Answer: B. Yes, I am engaged in Japanese Studies at another kind of organization.

Field of Study: Political Science/Economy

2. Please describe what you are currently doing. (If you have your own website or any relevant site, provide its URL.)

Answer: I hold a tenured, joint appointment in the Political Science and Asian Studies Departments at St. Olaf College. I teach undergraduate students. During my sabbatical in 2009-10, I was a visiting research fellow at the University of Tokyo, thanks a Fulbright Research scholarship.

3. Where did you acquire your most advanced Japanese language training for your research?

Answer: D.Other (While working in Japan as a staff member of Toshiba Corporation.)

4. Have you ever participated in the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme?

Answer: NO

5. Have you earned a doctoral degree?

Answer: YES
Year: 1998
Field: Political Science/Economy
University:  

Optional Inquiry:
1. Please describe briefly how the Japan Foundation Fellowship experience influenced your career.

Answer: The Japan Foundation award funded my doctoral dissertation research, which allowed me to complete the degree needed for my career. It was absolutely essential to my having the position I do today.

2. The Japan Foundation is planning to create a network or forum among past Japan Foundation fellows. Please let us know if you have any suggestions in terms of themes, format, etc.

Answer: It would be tremendously useful to have a network of people actively engaged in Japanese studies who are not affiliated with R1 institutions. Those of us employed by liberal arts colleges in the U.S. face very different challenges for maintaining active research agenda; yet it is many of our students who will go on to graduate study later. I would welcome the chance to discuss how best to build on our resources and respond to our challenges with the JF and JF alumni.