search/admin/spider_custom.php search/search.php fellowship_survey/survey.php Fellow Follow-up Survey Details - SETSUKO NISHI

PF (1985)

Fellow Information:
First Name
SETSUKO
Middle Name
MATSUNAGA
Last Name
NISHI
Sex
Female
Organization
Brooklyn College and The Graduate School, The City University of
Title
Professor Emerita of Sociology
Contact Address:
Address Type
Home
Address 1
95 Hickory Hill Road
Address 2 (optional)
 
City
Tappan
State
NY
Zip Code
10983
Country
United States
Telephone
845,359.0813
Email
smnishi@msn.com
*Survey URL
http://www.jfny.org/fellowship_survey/survey.php?id=3967&sid=9eb5c722c0924ba779e05bec0c63ca43
Questions:
1. Are you enaged in Japanese Studies?

Answer: A. Yes, I am engaged in Japanese Studies at a university or research institution.

Field of Study:  

2. Please describe what you are currently doing. (If you have your own website or any relevant site, provide its URL.)

Answer: Principal Investigator, Japanese American Life Course Project, a national study of the life course effects of the World War II incarceration of Japanese Americans. The research compares the long term effects for those who left the camps for college, for the Army, for the Tule Lake segregation camp .(including those who went to Japan), and for work in 1943, 1944, and 1945. The findings are being prepared for publication: tentative title--Recovery and Hidden Injuries: Wartime Incarceration and the Life Course of Japanese Americans.

3. Where did you acquire your most advanced Japanese language training for your research?

Answer: D.Other (What little Japanese language facillity I had was the residue of kmy childhood learning from parents and attending "Japaneses s)

4. Have you ever participated in the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme?

Answer: NO

Optional Inquiry:
1. Please describe briefly how the Japan Foundation Fellowship experience influenced your career.

Answer: It enhanced my understanding of some extreme outcomes of the US government's incarceration of Japanese Americans without charges nor trial, that is, of those who gave up their US citizenship and went to Japan at the end of the war, more often for family than political reasons. This was part of my long involvement in studies that were an outgrowth of the work of the Congressionally mandated Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians and related to my professional specialty in American race relations.

2. The Japan Foundation is planning to create a network or forum among past Japan Foundation fellows. Please let us know if you have any suggestions in terms of themes, format, etc.

Answer: My best wishes for this fine endeavor.