Events

Exhibition

02/22/2020 - 05/03/2020
Dayton (OH)

Samurai, Ghosts and Lovers: Yoshitoshi’s Complete 100 Aspects of the Moon

(Right) Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839–1892), Jade Rabbit – Sun Wukong, 1889, woodblock print, ink and color on paper. Dayton Art Institute, Museum purchase with funds provided by Jack Graef Jr., Linda Stein, Susan Shettler and their families in memory of Jack and Marilyn Graef, 2019.9.18
(Center) Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839–1892), Hazy-night moon – Kumasaka, 1887, woodblock print, ink and color on paper. Dayton Art Institute, Museum purchase with funds provided by Jack Graef Jr., Linda Stein, Susan Shettler and their families in memory of Jack and Marilyn Graef, 2019.9.43
(Left) Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839–1892), Change E flees to the moon, 1885, woodblock print, ink and color on paper. Dayton Art Institute, Museum purchase with funds provided by Jack Graef Jr., Linda Stein, Susan Shettler and their families in memory of Jack and Marilyn Graef, 2019.9.83

Time & Location

February 22-May 3
Dayton Art Institute (Dayton, OH)

About

The Dayton Art Institute’s opening 2020 exhibition, Samurai, Ghosts and Lovers: Yoshitoshi’s Complete 100 Aspects of the Moon, provides the rare chance to see all 100 works in Tsukioka Yoshitoshi’s epic series. The exhibition is an exceptional opportunity provided by the DAI’s recent acquisition of a rare complete album set, and a fitting conclusion to the museum’s Centennial Year. A selection of works from the DAI’s Japanese collection and loans will further enhance the experience of these endlessly fascinating masterpieces of Japanese art.

One of the outstanding series in the history of Japanese woodblock prints, Tsukioka Yoshitoshi’s (1839–1892) 100 Aspects of the Moon is also the culmination of the artist’s career. Issued as individual prints from 1885–1892, the series is a tour-de-force, combining diverse, striking designs with dramatic historical and mythical stories from Japan’s past, including samurai warriors and court ladies. The prints depict Shakespearean emotion—heroism and humor, love and loss, mystery and magic—and linking them all is the presence of the moon. Together, they form a concentrated introduction to Japanese culture, including its history, aesthetics, music, literature, performing arts, religions and festivals.

This exhibition is supported through the JFNY Grant for Arts and Culture.


For more information, please click here.



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